Effects on Ballistic

Wind

Wind has a range of effects, the first being the effect of making the bullet deviate to the side. From a scientific perspective, the “wind pushing on the side of the bullet” is not what causes wind drift. What causes wind drift is drag. Drag makes the bullet turn into the wind, keeping the centre of air pressure on its nose. There is more surface area in the middle and rear area of the bullet for the wind to push against rather than the small surface area on the pointed nose. This causes the nose to be cocked (from your perspective) into the wind, the base is cocked (from your perspective) “downwind.” So, (again from your perspective), the drag is pushing the bullet downwind making bullets follow the wind. A somewhat less obvious effect is caused by head or tailwinds. A headwind will slightly increase the relative velocity of the projectile, and increase drag and the corresponding drop. A tailwind will reduce the drag and the bullet drop. In the real world, pure head or tailwinds are rare and nearly non existant, since wind seldom is constant in force and direction and normally interacts with the terrain it is blowing over. This often makes ultra long range shooting in head or tailwind conditions difficult at best.

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